Seeking International Romani Female Writers

Romani Flag

Roughly a year and a half ago, I quietly put the word out that I was looking for Romani female authors who would contribute to the first annual Romani Feminist Anthology.

What is the purpose of this anthology?  To give Romani women from across the globe, from different backgrounds, the opportunity to have their struggle for racial and gender equality heard.  But, more than that, to use their literary superpowers to help those in our community who cannot articulate their hardships.

Writers will not be paid for their entries because all the book’s profits–yes, 100%–will be going to a Romani charity.  The authors selected will each have a vote as to which charity will be the recipient of the funding.

Stories must be a minimum of 1000 words and a rough maximum of 6000.

Those currently contributing to the anthology are actress Mihaela Dragan, novelist Glenda Bailey-Mershon, blogger Jessica Reidy, myself, Diana Norma Szokolyai, and Damaris Solis.

With any annual project, the first one is always the hardest to get off the ground and the time has come to cast a wider net.

Romani sisters, will you write to make the world a better place?

Romani brothers and allies, do you know someone who would be interested?

Please message me here on my blog or at:

romanifeministanthology@yandex.com

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Can a White Author Put “Gypsy” in a Book Title? Well….

As NaNoWriMo drew to a close, I began to debate how to get back to into my blog, featuring both a weekly Romani rights article as well as an author interview….  Which person to choose first out of the plethora on my to-read list?

That so-simple question would wind up being answered by an epically nasty bit of online drama, the specifics of which, to a very large degree boil down to one simple question: when portraying a minority main character, do White authors have the same rights as the minority itself?

In this instance, a White author’s main character was Romani.  And, in order to reach out to a broader audience, she used the word “Gypsy” in the book’s title.  I was asked to weigh in on this, book unread, on her author’s page….

For me, this indeed presented a tricky situation.  All who follow my activism at all know well that I have been protesting the use of the word “Gypsy” since long before many of my contemporaries.  How great is my dedication to this cause?  Great enough to nearly be arrested.  Below I include the article detailing the specifics of that incident.

http://dissidentvoice.org/June06/Trefil08.htm

Why am I cemented to this word being put in its proper place?  Because I am a three-time anti-Romani hate crime survivor and, with every incident, “Gypsy” was shoved in my face as a verbal excuse for everything that happened to me.

Rape was okay so long as my assailant called me a “Gypsy Princess” afterwards.

Trying to take my newborn son away was okay, so long as the hospital nurse told me, “Gypsies aren’t people.”

Trying to deny me my degree was okay, so long as the teacher told me that he didn’t know how “letting a Gypsy graduate would reflect on the school.”

I don’t need someone to tell me the gravity of what the slur word “Gypsy” can accomplish.  I see it in my face when I look in the mirror—not because of my ethnicity, but because, when I was nineteen, it earned me a broken nose which, to this day, bends just slightly to one side.  I’ve lived with that misshapen part of my face for so long that, usually, I don’t notice it anymore.  But, at the times that I do, it only furthers my resolve that I will be doing battle with that word until my end.

Back when I started campaigning against the G word, nearly twenty years ago, there was a lot more wiggle-room that the Gadje (non-Roma) community had regarding it.  “Roma” and “Romani” were not terms that most of them had much of a chance to ever hear or read without deliberately looking.

But that’s not the case today.  Too many Romani activists throughout the world have put tremendous effort into getting the mainstream population to acknowledge that we, as a people, have the same linguistic right to self-definition as anyone else.  Point of fact, some have even taken it further than I ever intended.  They don’t want to be identified as “Roma” or “Romani,” but instead by their specific tribal identity within the Romani system, much like some Native Americans prefer to be called Pomo, Lakota, Cherokee; et cetera.

Either way, you can’t put “Gypsy” into Google now without the search engine soon enough spitting back the term “slur word” into your face.

So back to the original question: can a Gadjo/ Gadji author write a good book with a Romani main character?  Sure.  That depends mainly on the personal talent of the writer in question than anything else.  But can they then use “Gypsy” in the title to help them sell copies?  The answer here should be an easy “no.”  Any way you slice it, that person is using a slur word for profit.

And yet…sadly…the answer is not so simple.

The fact of it is that, as the market currently stands, many authors know that their books will not find the audience that they are targeting and that they will not make money off the hard work that they have put into their book unless they do put the G word in the title.  No, the authors that I’m referring to here aren’t Gadje.  I’m talking about the majority of the authors who are considered some of the top dogs in Romani literary activism in the world….

So when the Romani author “elite” is consistently doing it, what position do they put those of us in who are trying to tell Whites to stop using this slur for profit?

Sure, sure, some people will inevitably pop up here and say, “Hey, we’re Roma, so it’s okay for us to make money off the slur.  It’s horrible and racist for Gadje, but it’s okay for us.”

I’m sorry, folks, but this argument has a pretty huge flaw in that slur-embracing benefits only an extremely small number of Roma and the rest of us wind up getting screwed.  It also leaves Gadje—especially Gadje authors—with a very mixed message.  And so long as that message continues to be mixed, the status of “Gypsy” as a slur word will continue to be in question among many people who do not necessarily mean it to be harmful; people who do not realize the harm that it has historically caused and will continue to cause.

To my Romani brothers and sisters, I can only point out what a change it was when, in a courtroom, there could be consequences for employers to call their African-American employees by the N word.  Now that victory didn’t come about easily.  That happened specifically through the decades of hard work, organized activism, and consistency on the part of the African-American people.

Roma people will get there.  We have made leaps and bounds in the last few decades towards improvement in social justice.  So is the degree of compromise where “Gypsy” is put in a book title still necessary for Romani-Americans today to get their readers?  The argument could be made for both yay and nay.  But such compromise definitely would not be necessary if the Romani community took a firm stand and said “no” to the slur word unanimously; said “no” we will not use this word to make money.

We are worth more than a title with “Gypsy” in it.  Our culture and our history are worth more than “Gypsy” will ever provide us with.

We deserve to be known for what we are.  We deserve for our ancestral origins to not be inaccurately attributed to a different country than India.  We deserve for our people to not be mistaken for other ethnic groups simply because they may share a few cultural traits with some of us.

To Gadje authors, I’ll say this: yours is a decision that is very largely based on personal morals.  Is it fair?  No.  Not by a long shot.  You’ve worked hard on a book.  You want to get paid for that.  But it’s a cold, hard fact that you won’t get nearly the paycheck for the job you’ve done if you don’t use the slur.  However, if you use the slur, there will be a backlash for your doing so.  If you don’t, there won’t be…yet likely neither the Gadje or Romani community will even notice your book exists.  Welcome to the wonderful world of writing about the Romani experience.  Either way, you can’t win.

To Roma, I say that if it offends you that a White author uses “Gypsy” in a book title, the best way that you can take a stand against this is to stop acting in a way which enables it.  That means a lot more than ganging up on that particular author online without reading their book.  It means that the people who you associate with yourself, your friends and family, who use “Gypsy” to make money, need to start being called out on the damage they are causing.  Because, make no mistake about it, they are providing Gadje with the shining example of why the use of this word is actually “okay.”

The thought of Roma holding Roma accountable for their actions regarding this is not as radical as many might like to claim.  There’s plenty of other ethnic minorities that have been in precisely the same shoes as us regarding this issue.  Many have managed to pull themselves up by the bootstraps.  We’re still not quite there.  But tick tok, tick tok, we will get there….

Lastly, to the ones on both sides who claim this word is not as bad as I make out, I leave you with the 1828 Webster Dictionary’s definition of its meaning.  How can you defend this?  How can you “take it back” and turn it into a positive term?  If the answer to that leaves you uncomfortable or you hesitate, you know very well whether or not you should be using it to promote your business.

“GIP’SEY, n. The Gipseys are a race of vagabonds which infest Europe, Africa and Asia, strolling about and subsisting mostly by theft, robbery and fortune-telling. The name is supposed to be corrupted from Egyptian, as they were thought to have come from Egypt. But their language indicates that they originated in Hindoostan.

  1. A reproachful name for a dark complexion.
  2. A name of slight reproach to a woman; sometimes implying artifice or cunning.

A slave I am to Clara’s eyes:

The gipsey knows her power and flies.

GIP’SEY, n. The language of the gipseys.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Slavery and the Holocaust: Two Points for Non-Romani Authors to Not Forget

A question that has frequently been posed to me by Gadje (non-Romani) authors is how to write Romani characters into their books.  This question in itself merits an entire article to it, but, for the moment, I will share one aspect of Romani culture that tends to be overlooked by horror and fantasy writers, (whose genres tend to be the main ones portraying Roma in them.)

There are two major events that, to grasp the modern Romani mindset and thereby effectively write Romani characters, cannot be ignored—slavery and the Holocaust.

Europe has a documented history of using Roma as slaves almost from the time that they arrived there.  I was once asked to list which countries did this.  I replied that, to be perfectly honest, it would take less time to list which countries did not do it.  Of course, slaves weren’t always titled as “slaves.”  Euphemisms may occasionally be employed to make the slave-owners (and their descendants) feel more comfortable about said cruelty, but, in the end, if there is a sum of money exchanged for the bondage of a human being, the term is not as relevant as the attached agony.

As I am myself a Romani-American, I will enlighten audiences a bit on the subject of the origins of so many of my brothers and sisters on this continent today.

Contrary to the beliefs of many, the first slaves to be brought from to the “New World,” were not African.  Instead, they were Gitanos (Spanish Roma) carried over by none other than Christopher Columbus himself on his second voyage in 1498.  King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella’s infamous Christian Reconquista had, years earlier, labeled the Roma, along with the Jews and the Moors, as undesirables that would no longer be welcome in Spain.  By royal decree, all Roma were ordered to choose a master.  For those that refused, this was the beginning of a long and bloody history of Gitano persecution.  During upcoming centuries, not only would their Hindu-based religion be banned, but their traditional clothing and language as well.  They would, on pain of death, be bred with non-Roma in efforts to dilute their bloodlines and make them “more Spanish.”  Those who not unpredictably preferred the nomadic route, and sometimes even those who had settled, could be rounded up and shipped to both the Americas and to Africa.

In the 17th century, under Oliver Cromwell, the UK was no better in this regard.  People even mistaken for being Romani could be shipped off to the American colonies, Jamaica, and Barbados under the title of “indentured servant.”  A pretty myth about this status is that, after serving the length of your proclaimed sentence, you would simply be set free.  Oh no.  Much to the contrary, in fact.  It took precious little to have the sentence extended, such as the allegation by one’s master that the servant had been too lazy for the master to get their money’s worth.  This grim reality was particularly true for women, who, if impregnated during their sentence, would have their sentences extended for many years.  The children born during the “indenture” were, in turn, the property of the owner, sometimes for decades, even if the owner had himself fathered them.  Romani women, who, from one end of Europe to the other, had a history of being used like cattle for breeding purposes, could therefore be held legally in perpetuity, so long as their masters ensured that, through rape, they produced enough children.  This was, by no means, a brief historical horror.  The UK was still shipping the Roma off to Caribbean plantations to be slaves a century later.

Similar laws and practices abounded throughout Europe, but there was nowhere where the Roma endured slavery quite in the same fashion as they did modern-day Romania.  A common misconception is that Romani and Romanian are the same ethnic group.  No.  One is of Indian origin, (mainly from Rajasthan, Punjab, Sindh, and Haryana;) the other is Balkan European.  Nonetheless, the Romani have been part of Romanian society since roughly the 12th century.  There are different theories as to how they became slaves in the ancient kingdoms of Moldavia, Transylvania, and Wallachia.  The only thing that does remain very clear is that the slavery took hold extremely quickly after this particular branch of Europeans met with the Roma.  It was soon fully institutionalized and no less brutal than the one in the United States.  It continued for five hundred years until, after much effort from Romanian abolitionists, it was finally snuffed out in 1864.  At its end, a large portion of the freed slaves fled the country and, today, many Romani-Americans are the descendants of this particular exodus.

Romani Slaves 1862

(Above, a Romanian Romani family two years prior to the end of slavery.  Many slaves lived their lives in tents, as portrayed above.)

A Prime Lot of Gypsies to Be Sold

(Above, a notice advertising an upcoming auction of enslaved Romani men, women, and children.)

Suffice to say, in fact, whether it be from the UK or from Romania, slavery and escape from slavery were the two main driving forces beyond the majority of Romani-American families being here in the USA at all.  These concepts would be followed by a constant drive to escape the other persecutions of Europe—from which Romani immigrants are still fleeing to the US and Canada today….

For the Romani who stayed in Romania after slavery ended, life was predictably bleak.  During slavery, a Romanian term for a runaway slave translates in English to “incomplete one,” meaning that only a Romani person who was of inferior intellect would not wish to be a slave.  This deeply-ingrained belief in the mental inferiority of freed Romani people continued the economic and scholastic crippling of upcoming generations.  In a country which had previous allowed any White man, whether he owned her or not, to rape any Romani woman that he encountered, the myth of the hypersexual Romani seductress continued as well.  And, to this day, Romani women are more likely in certain areas—(Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Romania, and Slovakia,)—to be targeted for human trafficking than White women, partially because of this.

So, to authors seeking to write Romani characters, that’s a huge chunk of history that is still, however much mainstream European society has sought to sweep it under the rug, very much part of the Romani mindset.  Most Roma you encounter are not only quite aware that we have a significant past as slaves in Europe and the Americas, but that, if we were to ask people on the street about it, ninety-nine percent of them would have no idea that it had ever even happened at all.  We are also aware that, once educated, a huge portion of listeners would be of the “get over it” belief system.  According to mainstream society, our history has profoundly little value.  It is not unusual, when we highlight what happened to our ancestors, for us to simply be called liars.  Yet again, that erases the culpability of the oppressors and, especially in Eastern European countries where, to this day, Romani poverty and lack of education are very major problems, people do not want to understand the true process as to how these conditions came to be.  Yet it is undeniable that post-slavery mistreatment, based on the mindset of slave ownership, remains a key factor to this day.

Another simple fact that I like to point out to people is this: those from Romania who were born in slavery lived to see the Nazis take power.  And any Romani person from Romania that was under the age of seventy-five or so, who that was murdered in the concentration camps was the child, grandchild, or great-grandchild of human beings that had been born with the label of being White people’s “property.”

Those who question today, “Why can’t the Roma just pick themselves back up and integrate with mainstream society?” have to understand that, after slavery occurred, there was very little opportunity for the community to organize itself.  Massive PTSD from the tortures of enslavement aside, the general population went out of its way to ensure that Roma people did not have equal job opportunity.  Even now, throughout Eastern Europe, Romani children are frequently kept in segregated schools for the mentally handicapped.  Based on their skin color, they are denied a fair chance at life’s opportunity’s from essentially day one as part of government policy.

And what Romani-led organization to lift the community up there was, in many areas, was then obliterated by the Holocaust.  Psychologically and economically speaking, there was just not enough of a gap between slavery and the mass murder of our people to get ourselves firmly on our feet.

Maria Bihari

(Above, a Romani victim of the Holocaust.)

And about that Romani Holocaust, which most outsiders know next to nothing about, exactly how bad was it?  Most articles that do reference it are badly researched and place the estimate of our dead at a mere few thousand.  The reality is that it might be as high as one and a half million.  Deaths of Roma were not always recorded and, when they were, they were not always recorded as being Roma; rather than as Jews.  As a Romani woman myself, I lean far towards believing the one and a half million figure for the simple reason that every Romani person that I’ve ever met whose family was in Europe, (short of the UK,) during that time period has the same story that I do: their people were almost entirely, if not completely, obliterated.

Romani women from Lublin Ghetto

(Above, Romani Holocaust victims in the Lublin Ghetto.)

 

Romani Holocaust Victims

(Romani Holocaust victims.)

In all my life, I have never once had a Romani friend from my own tribal background.  My ancestors were slaves in Romania that escaped to what is today’s Czech Republic.  During the Holocaust, it is said that only around six hundred Roma from the entire Czech region survived the war.  That equates to ninety to ninety-five percent of the entire country’s known Romani population being murdered.  Consequently, my tribe, in books, has been called “extinct.”  Many Roma that I encounter have not even heard of our tribe before, as the Roma that currently live in Czech Republic mainly immigrated from other countries after World War II.

I recently published a story, “Shades of Equality,” in UnBound Emagazine.

UnBound 4

https://www.kalaage.net/issue/67/issue_1505143424105

The story deals with the current treatment of the Romani people in Slovakia; how they endure hate crimes, neo-Nazism, school segregation, forced sterilization, poverty, arranged marriage, and so-called “Roma walls,” which are built to keep Romani and White communities separate.  As UnBound Emagazine is now being promoted by the publishing platform, Kalaage, I was soon contacted by Kalaage with an offer to put one of my thousand-word short stories in September’s edition of Ink Drift Magazine—another of their featured literary enterprises.

https://www.kalaage.net/

This was quite a thrill, as this particular issue also showcased an article on writing horror novels by my very good friend, Aindrila Roy, the best-selling author of “I See You,” as well as an interview with the well-known Romani author-activist, Oksana Marafioti.  Several other prominent writers–some I knew; some I didn’t–were making appearances and giving feedback on our craft.  And it’s definitely when you are in such good company that you know you have the most to lose by turning in something below par.

Cast

Ultimately, I was determined to write something about the Holocaust’s legacy—mainly because the readership from UnBound Emagazine has been incredibly receptive to authentic Romani portrayals, our true history, and not expected any of the usual “Gypsy” stereotypes that plague us.  As they are published out of Mumbai, I can even occasionally throw in a word or two from our language, Romanes, and feel quite confident that the majority of those reading will know what I’m saying—something that I certainly could not expect from a European or American publication.

But how to talk about the Holocaust in one thousand words?  In a short story format, no less?

Romani Holocaust Victim

(Another Romani Holocaust victim.)

Well, I thought first that I would discuss Lety—the concentration camp for Bohemian Roma, which has long been the center of the spotlight as activists have had to wage their own war to bring an end to its usage as a pig farm.

Lety

(Lety Concentration Camp for Bohemian Roma.)

Those Roma who did not die in Lety were shipped directly to Auschwitz.  Did I have relatives in Lety?  Through my paternal g-grandmother’s side, probably.  There was never contact with a single one of them after World War II.  One could argue that the silence speaks for itself.

But, as I sat to type, I had to note that there was another concentration camp—Hodonin—which was, like Lety, run by Czechs, not Germans, and had set itself to the task of either personally killing or sending its thousands of surviving victims on to Auschwitz.  As with Lety, Hodonin is another probable place for my family to have died or been transferred from.

Hodonin

(Hodonin Concentration Camp for Moravian Roma.)

So what was the unheard story of Hodonin?  In the average Holocaust film, one sees some semblance of the Nazis being brought down in the end.  This was far from the case for the camps designed for Romani extermination though.  Their guards were not prosecuted.  They did not even have to hide their identities.  They lived in the same communities that they grew up in, with all their neighbors fully knowing them for the murdering bastards they were…and choosing to overlook it because, after all, the dead were “just Gypsies.”

Rather than being turned into a memorial, Hodonin received a reaction from the local populace every bit as disrespectful to the dead as Lety’s pig farm—arguably, more-so.  Its site became a recreational center.  One of the former barracks of the Romani prisoners was turned into a restaurant.  A swimming pool for White tourists to play in was erected where people, only decades earlier, because of the color of their skin fought to not succumb to starvation, complications from Czech-enforced slave labor, and typhoid.

https://www.inkdrift.com/issues/

To be perfectly honest, when I submitted the story, “The Fountain of Youth,” about Hodonin, I very well would not have been surprised if it had been refused acceptance by Ink Drift simply because the details that I was having to squeeze into the tiny word count were almost too inhumane to believe—not because the Holocaust had happened, but because of the government’s reaction after the war was over.  That so many locals could, without being able to use the excuse of the Nazis being in power, treat the genocide of their country’s ethnic minority so cavalierly that you could literally walk into a place and order lunch where people died….it simply raised the question, “How could they live with themselves?”

But this is the reality of being Romani.  However much it has been romanticized in literature, ours is, while a proud culture, in many ways not one possessing a history to be envied.  What most Romani worldwide today long for is when that history—the truth of it—will no longer be ignored.

So, writers, the next time that you ask a Romani person for advice on how to include a Romani character in your books, here’s what I would say: do your research first.  Learn what we’ve been through.  Learn what we are still going through.  And, after you’ve done that, then ask the question, do you really want to be the kind of person to portray a caricature or a human being with genuine depth, who just happens to come from a different racial background?  The one is easy and may indeed earn you readers.  But the books that stand the test of time are forged from quality, not clichés.  And, when you ask your questions, a Romani person’s response may very well be, “Are you writing a pot-boiler or actual literature?”

 

 

 

 

 

Author Saikumar Yerubandi Sheds Light on a Little-Acknowledged Disability

sai photo

I first encountered Saikumar Yerubandi when we both wound up published in the second issue of UnBound Emagazine, the creation of my favorite literary group—“For Writers by Authors” (FWBA.)  A mutual love of paleontology, (for which the idea of a book anthology has been kicked around from time to time,) and interest in human rights sparked a pleasant online friendship.  We would both later be published in the next UnBound issue…and, only a few days ago, the one after that as well.

The subject material of Yerubandi’s latest work “Mah Color, My Life” hit me on a very deep level and only half-way through reading it, rather than simply giving his piece a review, I knew that I wanted to do an actual feature.  Simply put, the autobiographical story has more than writing appeal.  There is a strong social and educational importance to the piece which needs to be shared for the greater good of both the international able-bodied and disabled community.

Without further ado, the interview:

G: To an audience who has never read you before, can you say a few words about yourself?

S: A dark balding South Indian who refuses to accept that I am on the wrong side of 50.  A farmer who became a geologist by accident whose heart still beats for his village.  I write short stories and flash fiction more as a hobby.  (I just completed my flash fiction #48 last week “the chota peg series.”)  God forbid someday I might seriously think of becoming a writer.  Readers be warned.

G: What is your preferred genre and what type of writing format do you typically use in order to bring it to life?

S: The genre that comes naturally to me is humour.  I love to write horror too.  The topics I normally write are related to day to day social issues.  What I can’t do is Romance, I mean, the genre.

G: In your short story, “Mah Color, Mah Life,” (which recently debuted in UnBound Emagazine Issue 4, and is being promoted by Kalaage,) you talk about various difficulties that you have had to overcome at different times in your life because you are color blind.  Several times, you reference hardship in your early school years.  Do you feel that teachers are properly educated about the different perception of color blind students?

S: Well, frankly in India, even to this day, probably half the teachers are not even aware of this handicap in the children.  Probably the inability to differentiate shades of colours is attributed to the low IQ of the child.  It is only in recent times the schools are appointing student counselors to understand issues like Dyslexia, dysgraphia, ADHD, and so on.  I hope that colour blindness is given equal importance.

G: What advice would you give a teacher who has a color blind student in their class for the first time?

S: The first thing the teacher needs to do is understand the trauma that the child goes thru vis-a-vis teasing and bulling by other students on his inability to differentiate colours, and guide and help the child to deal with it by learning to laugh at oneself.  And sensitizing the other classmates.

G: By profession, you are a geologist. I would imagine that color blindness must make the identification of many rocks extremely difficult, yet you persevere nonetheless.  What words would you have to skeptics regarding the capabilities of the color blind in the work force?

S: If early on in life if you identify your handicap, avoid jobs that require you to deal with colours.  You’ll save yourself and others a lot of uncomfortable situations.  But, having said that, take this disability as a challenge in your personal hobbies.

G: Regarding driving a vehicle, which presents issues as well, is there any advice that you have for color blind children as well as their parents as to what to expect?

S: Well since there not much a person afflicted with colour blindness can do about it, the onus lies on the state to make the signals more user friendly…like, instead of just the colours red, green, and yellow, the signals should have a pictorial display as well.  (It is already in vogue in many countries.)  Alternatively just follow a vehicle right in front of you and do what he does.  This is of course fraught with the risk of following a bad driver who jumps signals, like it happened to me once.

G: Despite repeated publications by UnBound Emagazine in the past, when they announced the theme for this issue, (“A Riot of Colors,”) you almost did not enter.  Do you feel that many other color blind people have this hesitation to talk about the impact of color in general, let alone actual color blindness, in their lives, even with respected friends and colleagues?

S: Yes.  I am sure most colour blind people would rather push it under the carpet, rather than expose themselves to their handicap fearing ridicule.  I guess most people in general try to hide those not so visible handicaps to friends and colleagues.  Having said that, yes, the writers are a bold breed and they don’t hesitate.

G: In the past, you have written short stories whose fictional characters deal with gender violence, women’s equality, and animal rights.  In the future, will your fiction have color blind characters also?

S: Hmm…that’s a good idea.  My only dilemma would be whether to make it a serious social issue or a humorous one.

G: In fiction, have you encountered any positive, accurate portrayals by other authors of color blind characters that you can direct readers to?

S: Unfortunately, I haven’t come across any one writing on this subject.  I am not even sure if there are any groups dealing with this.  I would love to browse the net for the same.

G: If not, what effect does this have on you, both as a color blind person, and as a writer?

S: I am glad I wrote on this subject and happy to see people liked it, and hope that in future more writers affect by this handicap will feel free to do so.  Not only colour blindness but on other invisible disabilities too.

G: Do you feel that the public in general has a large degree of misconceptions about the realities of being color blind?  How do you feel the disability is generally portrayed?

S: Insensitive people will only find it as another subject to make fun of, for example lisping, squint etc.  Like me, the person suffering from this disability will try to hide it and pretend that all is well.

G: Though not color blind, as a person with a disability, I identified a great deal with many of the emotional aspects described in your piece.  Do you plan on promoting what you’ve written for UnBound Emagazine in disability groups online for the benefit of those who do not, as you do, have gifts with the written word?

S: I would like to see this piece being shared on as many disability groups as possible and let people know it is nothing to be ashamed of.  I accept both the gifts of the Almighty—the ability to write and the colour blindness with equal grace.

G: Now that you have publicized your disability in a literary format, how does it make you feel?

S: I feel relieved.  I no longer need to be ashamed of my disability and I also realized not all people are insensitive to a fact that people can’t differentiate between, say, red and brown and it is NOT because they are idiots.

G: Two questions that I ask all fellow people with a disability: is there anything that you consider a positive aspect of your physical difference?  Are there any ways that it has helped influence your life for the better?

S: My own disability have made me more sensitive and appreciative to people with different disabilities and their resilience to overcome them, some of which are more serious, and we have inherited them and not out of choice.

G: What is next on the writing horizon for Saikumar Yerubandi?

S: For the next prompt for #UnBound magazine (theme: “The Shape of You”)…I plan to write something different.  Probably a mythology explained through Science fiction.  Hopefully, if I can block out Ed Sheeran’s tune from playing non-stop in my head while doing so.

Shape of You

G: In conclusion, speaking only for myself, I must admit that, prior to “Mah Color, Mah Life,” I was pretty ignorant about the condition.  Now that I’ve learned a bit about it, I would really like to see color blind characters begin to take their rightful place in fiction—particularly when written by authors who are color blind themselves and therefore definitely know what they are talking about.  There is no reason for color blindness, like so many other disabilities, to be shoved into the closet any longer.  In an era when racism and skin colorism are both finally being highlighted for the full wrong that they are, disablism, however, still seems to find itself largely being ignored by warriors for social justice.  Disabled authors have the ability to change that, even if it is one short story at a time.  As Yerubandi can certainly prove.

 

“Mah Color, Mah Life” may be read here:

https://www.kalaage.net/issue/67/issue_1505143424105

UnBound 4

 

Yerubandi’s previous UnBound publication “Sri Rama Raksha” in issue #2 here:

https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/656583

Strength of a Woman

 

Yerubandi’s two stories in Issue #3, “Eknath Lonekar,” and “Chicken Little,” maybe be found here:

 

And, Yerubandi’s blog, which might, in the future, feature other short stories and his flash fiction “Chota Peg” series here:

https://ysaikumar.wordpress.com/author/ysaikumar/

Three Famous Romani Women…That No One Talks About

A year or two ago, while browsing in a Romani chat room online, I encountered a strain, started by and contributed to by a number of major Facebook Romani male activists, whose identities in considering the subsequent moral dilemma seem a bit on the irrelevant side.  In a word, the men were all veritably losing their mind with glee because they had learned that a major “Game of Thrones” star had identified themself publicly as a “Gypsy.”  They were debating how to contact said actor, how to get them to join up with various Romani rights groups as a representative, and just waxing poetic in general about how awesome it was that this particular individual turned out to be, as they say, “tatcho rat”—true blood.

Now, anyone who is Romani that actually bothers to do the slightest degree of research online might assume that they were referencing Oona Chaplin, the granddaughter of the legendary Romani actor and director, Charlie Chaplin.  On “Game of Thrones,” Ms. Chaplin played “Talisa Maegyr,” wife of “Robb Stark.”

But, oh no no.  These men knew nothing about the lovely Oona.  And when I pointed her presence out to them, they completely ignored it; completely ignored her.

The subject of their adoration was instead Jason Momoa, aka “Khal Drogo,” who had created an organization called “Pride of Gypsies.”

When you click on the website, the first thing which you read is:

 

“Pride (prid)-A group of lions forming a collective.

Gypsy (jip-see)-A nomadic or free-spirited person.

Pride of Gypsies was founded by Jason Momoa in 2010, a tribe of artists & filmmakers with an enthusiastic thirst for creating unique and inventive content, harnessing an atypical approach to production.

Cut from the old- letting light, sound, and movement tell the stories, our pursuit for magnificent adventures is infused with innovation and excellence that improves the human spirit.”

 

Mr. Momoa, however “free-spirited” he may find himself, is in no way Romani, but instead Hawaiian, Native American, German, and Irish.  I pointed this as well out to the Google-adverse men who were salivating over him, but just as they ignored Oona Chaplin, they now seemed determined to ignore the fact that Momoa wasn’t the real thing.

So what was it about Jason Momoa which blew Oona Chaplin so completely out of the water?  As these men kept referencing the TV show, let’s take a look at their characters….  Momoa plays a rape-advocating, slave-owning, gleefully-murdering warlord who sexually assaults his arranged marriage wife on several occasions.  (But, hey, that’s okay, because she supposed learns to enjoy sex with her marital rapist anyway.  Hurray for Stockholm syndrome!)  To film some of the rape scenes, Momoa was nude, but covered his genitalia with a plush, pink sock.  Chaplin, to the contrary, played a relatively virtuous character, who nurses the wounded after battle, and eventually marries one of the show’s nice guys.  Their sex is completely consensual.  Chaplin then winds up stabbed to death, while pregnant.  Chaplin was, like Momoa, nude for her role.  Momoa made jokes about his nakedness.  As for her own, Chaplin stated: “The objectification lies in the eye of the beholder, just like beauty.  I’m really comfortable getting my kit off, so, if they want to, I’m like, ‘yeah, bring it, I’m naked, no problem.’ ”

Well, for Oona, there may be no issue, but, judging by the stone-cold silence from the Romani activist crowd, who tend to be all too quick to cash in on one of our own making it big, there was a problem indeed.  Else a Gadjo (non-Rom) proclaiming himself a Gypsy wouldn’t take precedence over a woman from a well-respected English Romani bloodline.

But she’s not the only one who the community tends to shove into the back of the closet.

In 1985, “Return to Oz,” (based of the L Frank Baum book “Glenda of Oz,”) was filmed.  In this sequel, little Dorothy Gale finds herself yet again in a position where she must risk her life to both get home and save the magical kingdom from its current bad guy.  And who did the very-coveted role go to?  Eleven-year-old Romani actress, Fairuza Balk.

Balk would go on to play many major Hollywood roles in the 1980s and 1990s, such as Valmont’s “Cecile,” American History X’s “Stacey,” The Waterboy’s “Vicki Vallencourt,” and, likely her most famous role, “Nancy” from The Craft.  Today, she continues to act, as well as do artwork and blog.

But Romani activists, when they list the famous of Hollywood, almost always leave her out in the cold also.  Does it matter that the actress is not only very open about her heritage, but even has a triangle tattoo on her arm memorializing the Romani Holocaust?  Does it matter that she, at least at one point, used her fame to try to help raise awareness as well as funding for Romani rights by adding information and donation links to her website?

Apparently not.  And why might that be?  Well, well, it would appear that this Romani actress has also done nudity-included sex scenes.  Could it be that, regardless of her efforts to improve the lot of her people, her entitlement to control the portrayal of her own body on film simply overrides her other traits?

Perhaps that would be a question for Noomi Rapace, the Swedish actress of Spanish Romani descent who skyrocketed to worldwide fame for her portrayal of Lisbeth Salander in “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.”  Rapace was repeatedly nude, via both rape and consensual sex, in this film and its two sequels.  Does it matter that the movies had to do with such themes as exposing incest, solving anti-Semitic murders, pointing out the potential for the exploitation of women by government officials, the lack of aid for women suffering domestic violence, and the rampancy of human trafficking?  My best guess is…”no.”

Because, at the end of the day, ours is not a culture that, for any reason besides her husband’s pleasure, a woman has the right to be naked.

Chaplin, Balk, and Rapace are not the stereotype of the “Good Romani Woman.”  Oh, to the contrary, they are very far from it.  And the community’s vast silence in their regard, spanning so many years, makes sure that they, as well as outsiders, know it. Sadly, very likely they will stay ignored, no matter what they might do in the future in order to better the condition of their people.  Because, however much culturally we, the Romani, are diversifying on the issue of women’s rights—the powers that be are often still ruling with an iron fist.  And nothing is so terrifying to such individuals as the independent Romani women who, bluntly put, don’t give a flying fuck about communal approval.

As I read recently, underneath a post about Giuvlipen, a Romani theatre group in Romania which promotes feminism and GLBT Romani rights, “real Romani women reject feminism.”

Well, feminism is not necessarily nudity, nor is nudity necessarily empowerment.  But forcing a system of values on a woman in order to control or contain her sexuality—values which she does not agree with—does not protect or elevate the concept of Romani womanhood or purity.  It reduces it to nothing but a commodity; a status which can be stripped away brutally.

There will be no advance of Romani rights while this behavior continues.  Because however much it hides beneath the claim of “morality,” the restriction of a woman’s right to do with her own body as she chooses, merely paves the path to many of the gender-based problems, including violence, that Romani women, like so many other women of color, disproportionately endure.

Oona Chaplin’s place among the ignored perhaps is the biggest symbol of this because there has likely never been in the last fifty years a list drawn up by any Romani male activist of famous Romani people without Charlie Chaplin’s name right at the top.  But dear old Charlie, however talented he was as a performer, absolutely epitomized the exact opposite of decent Romani living.  Point of fact, if he had ever been taken before an old-school Romani judgment tribunal, it’s almost impossible that he would not have been formally shunned.  He was a batterer, a sexual predator, a pedophile, a routine seducer that deliberately sought the company of White girls in opposition to fellow people of color, and, to boot, used his acting skills to portray caravan Roma onscreen as the kidnappers and violent abusers of White teenage girls.  Oh, yes, he’s known for spoofing Hitler in “The Little Dictator,” but if Romani people want a realistic view of him, it’s “The Vagabond,” filmed in 1916, which they need to take an honest look at.  If Oona Chaplin starred in a remake of the uber-racist, stereotype-spouting “The Vagabond,” what would happen to her, I wonder?  My best guess is that she’d be veritably roasted alive, yet, because Charlie was male, him making a living by throwing his fellow Roma under the bus is, much like Oona’s heritage, quietly ignored.

Last night, online, I encountered a non-Romani blogger’s list of Romani actresses.  It did showcase these three women.  My pleasure at seeing this was quickly overshadowed by a female Romani blogger making discriminatory responses, basically to the tune of how many of the women listed are simply not Romani enough to qualify as true Roma.  She implied that they capitalize on passing as White when, point of fact, not one of them has done this and two of them who could very well have hidden their identity went out of their way to showcase it.  This Romani female’s response did not surprise me.  Even though people know the real reason that these women are being excluded, it’s not considered acceptable by many to actually vocalize it.  It’s much easier, and certainly less embarrassing for the speaker, to cast aspersions on the basis of mixed heritage.

To which I respond: is your half-sister not still your sister?  Are not all the grandchildren of your grandparent still your cousins?  Even if the way they talk, dress, or conduct themselves is different from you, so long as they do not hurt anyone, do their differences completely eradicate the fact that blood is still blood?  If your position is that it does, perhaps that says more about your loyalty to your people than it does about theirs.

Chaplin, Balk, and Rapace each deserve the respect of being treated as a phen by their own people.  I pray sincerely that I am proved wrong and, in time, they receive it.

And to you, my brother activists, keep something in mind: if you claim to represent the Romani people—then that includes women too, even the ones who march to their own drums.  And if you automatically support the rights of a phral over a phen, then the reality is that you have true respect for neither gender.  By degrading the second, you bring shame to the first.

As for those entertainers who are not Romani, but use the word “Gypsy” in order to boost their notoriety—(shout out to you, Mr. Momoa!)—if ever it enters your head to call yourself a “Gypsy,” know this: that is privilege which, ethically, you do not have.  And it does create problems amongst the ethnic group who have been labeled with this word—a word, for the record—that a very large percentage of us consider a straight-up racial slur.  Don’t use it.

Just.

Don’t.